How to Write an Effective Thank You Letter

Thank-You-Note-iStockCandidates that take the time to follow-up with a thank you letter after an interview make the best impression on employers. Yet professionals say that very few candidates take advantage of this courtesy, regardless of the industry. Writing effective an legal thank you letter is not easy though. It takes time and effort.

Even though the message is simple, you don’t want it to be too short nor do you want long, scholarly paragraphs. Be genuine and let your personality come through. You can set yourself apart from your competition by writing a legal thank you note to potential law firms.

5 Steps to Writing a Legal Thank You Letter

1. Always send thank you letter with 24 hours of the interview.

Always send your thank you letter the same day you interview, or no later than the following day. In today’s digital age, email is the most efficient way to send your thank you letter in a timely manner.

You can also take a more personal approach by writing a handwritten note, although it’s not necessary. If you do hand write your legal thank you letter, ensure that’ll it arrive within a day or two of your interview.

2. Thank the interviewer for their time.

The interviewing process is just as time consuming for the employer. Express your thanks for the opportunity to meet with them and appreciation for the time spent with you. This will impress the interviewer by showing you respect their position regardless of the outcome.

For example: “Thank you for the opportunity to meet with you on Tuesday. The time you spent describing the position and the firm environment was greatly appreciated.”

3. Reiterate your interest in the position and firm.

Make a specific comment relating to the interviewer or the firm indicating your interest in the position. It’s your opportunity to show a potential employer that you are motivated to succeed. Employers that see you are dedicated to their specific firm will be more likely to give you the opportunity. Try and mention any specifics about the firm within your legal thank you letter.

For example: “Your presentation of the firm, together with the opportunity to practice environmental law have further convinced me that an association with (firm name) would be a good fit.”

4. Remind the interviewer of qualifications you bring to the position.

Chances are you are one of many candidates for a position. Employers can find it difficult to remember specifics for each person. A legal thank you letter is a great chance to reiterate any of the key qualifications you can bring to the position. It’s also an excellent opportunity to include anything you may have forgotten to mention in-person.

For example: “As we discussed, my experience in advising corporate clients on environment and regulatory issues can contribute greatly to building your environmental department.”

5. Express your desire for a follow-up meeting.

Close with another thank you, letting the interviewer know that you value the time he/she spent with you and express your expectation of a follow-up meeting. This shows employers that you are prepared to move forward. It’s important to be sure it’s not phrased in a way that seems like an expectation, but a privilege.

For example: “Thank you again for your time. I look forward to meeting with you again soon.”

If you follow these steps, you will be doing far more than your competition. Take advantage of what others fail to do!

Gain expert insight into today’s legal job market.

What legal and non-legal skills do you need? How much technology knowledge should you have? This white paper breaks down the information you need to succeed.

Download your guide to success in the legal market today!  »

Attract & Retain Top Talent

With a rapidly changing industry, it's vital to offer the right compensation and set the right expectation. With our Salary Guide, get detailed job descriptions, industry insights and local salary data to equip your managers with hiring confidence and expertise.

Get your copy »

Get email updates about more content like this.

Comments

| Next articles in The Column blog |

Get the | foundation | you need to hire the best legal talent.

Request your copy of our 2018 Salary Guide »
GO NOW
LOAD MORE
LOAD MORE
LOAD MORE
March 08, 2018

Press For The Progress That You Deserve: International Women’s Day 2018

The 2018 International Women's Day theme is #PressforProgress, which unquestionably means different things to different people. However, I think it's safe to say that most all women support gender equality and equal pay, and want to work in a safe environment where they feel valued for their professional contributions. While the legal field is certainly not immune to gender parity issues, being a female and an attorney does not necessarily mean you're forever disadvantaged against your male counterparts.
Read Post »
March 01, 2018

Looking for the Summer Internship of a Lifetime?

If a summer internship that invites you to meet, travel and learn from Fortune Global 500 company executives sounds like your idea of a valuable experience, our CEO for One Month program is the one you've been searching for. This program invites top interns to compete for a chance to go straight to the top of our Global Fortune 500 parent company, the Adecco Group, as the CEO for One Month. And we should mention - the top contender takes home a $10,000 paycheck. Here's how it works.
Read Post »
February 22, 2018

Organize Your Life: Technology to Keep You On-Track in 2018

It's the new year, and many people are setting goals to be more organized and on-schedule in 2018. If you're a busy lawyer or law student, it can sometimes be difficult to keep track of all your responsibilities, deadlines and goals on a daily basis. Technology can play a big role in helping you stay on task and meeting your education, job and personal goals. Here are some technological resources that can help you stay organized and reach all your goals in 2018.
Read Post »
LOAD MORE
LOAD MORE
December 07, 2017

Salary-History Bans: How to Navigate the Changing Legislation

Knowing a job candidate's prior pay gives hiring managers useful insight during the interview process. But that line of inquiry might need to be buried forever. In states from Massachusetts to Oregon, as well as individual cities, new laws now prohibit asking a job candidate to disclose their previous salary. Some of the laws and penalties for infractions don't take effect until 2018 and beyond, but it's time to prepare hiring managers for a new reality.
Read Post »
LOAD MORE